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NEWS

CSLA-OALA 2021 Congress
A Green Recovery for a Great Recovery

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May 27 – 29, 2021

The CLR will participate in this year CSLA 2021 Congress. Presentations will highlight new policies and concrete action towards the implementation of low carbon resilience approaches to planning and design and the integration of nature-based solutions as a multi-beneficial approach to managing and sustaining our lands, waters and communities.

Gutter to Gulf to 'Glades
Studio Ecologies

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April 23, 2021

Professors Fadi Masoud, Elise Shelley and Jane Wolff participated in the Frances Loeb Library Faculty Colloquium Series at Harvard University. The symposium titled "Studio Ecologies:
Designing Landscape Architectural Education for Unpredictable Futures
" focused on the symptoms and systems of the climate crisis and invited designers and academic practitioners to examine their teaching work to develop practices in landscape architecturet hat extend on current core competencies.
Panelists: Anita Berrizbeitia, Elisa Cattaneo, Rosalea Monacella, Bridgett Keane, Paola Vigano

CLR Participates in
2021 NGV Melbourne Design Week

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March 26  – April 5 2021

The Climate Imaginary Exhibition and Roundtable curatedby Leire Asensio Villoria & David Mah showcased a growing body of work from both local and international designers, researchers and students that offer us captivating visions of an imaginative commitment to addressing the climate emergency. A conversation between some of the leading figures working on the climate imaginary was hosted on the University of Melbourne’s online platform.

LA+ CREATURE WINNERS

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From over 470 entrants, 258 designs, 47 countries ! CLR Research Associate Ambika Pharma, Niko McGlashan scored a win and Hillary DeWildt an honorable mention.

LA+ CREATURE—the third in the LA+ international design ideas competition series—asked how we can use design to open our cities, our landscapes, and our minds to a more symbiotic existence with other creatures. From a total of 258 designs, LA+ CREATURE’s eminent interdisciplinary jury—comprising Timothy Morton, Farre Nixon, Chris Reed, Jennifer Wolch, Kate Orff, and Andrew Grant—awarded 5 winners and 10 honorable mentions.

Green Only for Some

Micallef, Shawn. “Green Only for Some, Toronto Must Commit to More and Better Parks after COVID-19.”
The Toronto Star. May 31, 2020, sec. Contributors.

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School of Cities: Coronavirus and the City: One Question
The School of Cities launched this series with the understanding that COVID-19 presents cities with a host of serious challenges, while at the same time raising critical questions about our urban future. Although COVID-19 is primarily a public health challenge, no element of urban life appears untouched by the pandemic.

This series presents a way for the School of Cities to collaborate on the city’s eventual recovery.

Building for Change...

CBC News “Building for change in the face of climate change” in the wake of the 2019 hurricane season and the devastation of hurricane Dorian.
CBC Radio Interviews: By Marc Montgomery. Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2019

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Ontario Morning – “Friday September 6, 2019 - Part 2”

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John H. Daniels Faulty – “Assistant professor Fadi Masoud talks to the CBC about designing with climate change in mind.”

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Fadi Masoud Wants to Save Our Cities from Flooding

Onstad, Katrina. “Fadi Masoud Wants to Save Our Cities from Flooding.”
University of Toronto Magazine, Autumn 2019.

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University of Toronto Magazine ran a full profile piece featuring Fadi Masoud’s work, research, and personal journey in their 2019 Autumn Issue. The article was written by Katrina Onstad, a 2019 Gold Medal National Magazine Award winner. The article is titled: “Fadi Masoud Wants to Save Our Cities from Flooding. In Toronto’s transforming waterfront, he sees the beginnings of a more resilient urban form.”

Resilience Districts Boston

“Resilience Districts Boston.” Gallery 9: School of Architecture + Planning MIT, Curated by Alan Berger & Jonah Susskind – April 18 - May 24  

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“The Resilience Districts Boston exhibition introduces a new zoning tool called Resilience Districts for adapting the Greater Boston Area to climate change. Resilience Districts serve as a governance structure for mitigating and pooling systemic risks, capturing agglomeration benefits, and providing a potential framework for metropolitan resettlement.”

Why Zoning is Key

Levitt, Jana. “Why Zoning Is Key to Combatting Climate Change.”
Azure Magazine, February 29, 2019.

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Competition work by: Drew Adams and Fadi Masoud was included in the book, Design for Flooding: Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design for Resilience to Climate Change. Design for Flooding is a professional textbook by Donald Watson and Michele Adams published by John Wiley and Sons. The book provides a knowledge base and guidelines for design professionals and municipal officials involved with flooding, severe weather, climate change, and the prospect of rising sea level. Their project, About Rising Tides: It’s the Delta Stupid, is one of eight international works selected for a chapter focused on examples that address: stormwater and floodplain management; flood-resistant design and adaptation to sea level rise; multidisciplinary design approaches; and innovative design and construction for protection and improvement of water security.

An Interview with Fadi Masoud

Ashley Pelfrey and Rachel Smith “An Interview with Fadi Masoud” in Flux: Design in TransitionFlux: Design in Transition Volume 38, 2017 North Carolina State University, College of Design – pp 64-69

The Student Publication is one of the oldest student-led design journals in the country. Among the design luminaries who have contributed to its pages are Le Corbusier, Mies Van der Rohe, Buckminster Fuller and Richard Saul Wurman. This year’s theme, FLUX: Design in Transition, provides a means of adding diversity and new perspectives on design processes and practices. In nearly every aspect of design, change, whether packaged in the form of something big or small, is inevitable. This FLUX, or constant state of change, provides a means of adding diversity and new perspectives on design process and practice. Designers must ultimately exist in a state of fluidity, and acknowledge changes in process, collaboration, and ways of thinking to move forward and create alternative, and preferable, futures.  

...On Hurricane Irma and Flooding in South Florida

Ahmed-Ullah, Noreen. “U of T’s Landscape Architecture Expert on Hurricane Irma and Flooding in South Florida.”
University of Toronto News, September 8, 2017.

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The American Dream of Suburbia is Evolving...

Leanna, Garfield. “The American dream of suburbia is evolving — here’s what it’ll be like to live in the suburb of the future.” By Leanna Garfield.  
Business Insider: Posted: Mar. 11, 2017, 10:00 AM

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American Suburbs...

Lutz, Ashley. “The American suburbs as we know them are dying.”  
Business Insider: Posted: Mar. 5, 2017, 7:30 AM

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Public Media

Green Only for Some

Micallef, Shawn. “Green Only for Some, Toronto Must Commit to More and Better Parks after COVID-19.”
The Toronto Star. May 31, 2020, sec. Contributors.

Read

School of Cities: Coronavirus and the City: One Question
The School of Cities launched this series with the understanding that COVID-19 presents cities with a host of serious challenges, while at the same time raising critical questions about our urban future. Although COVID-19 is primarily a public health challenge, no element of urban life appears untouched by the pandemic.

This series presents a way for the School of Cities to collaborate on the city’s eventual recovery.

Public Media

Green Only for Some

Micallef, Shawn. “Green Only for Some, Toronto Must Commit to More and Better Parks after COVID-19.”
The Toronto Star. May 31, 2020, sec. Contributors.

Read

School of Cities: Coronavirus and the City: One Question
The School of Cities launched this series with the understanding that COVID-19 presents cities with a host of serious challenges, while at the same time raising critical questions about our urban future. Although COVID-19 is primarily a public health challenge, no element of urban life appears untouched by the pandemic.

This series presents a way for the School of Cities to collaborate on the city’s eventual recovery.